Historic sites in the Seacost Region.

Historic sites in the Seacost Region of New Hampshire.

American Independence Museum

1 Governor’s Lane
Exeter, New Hampshire. (603) 772-2622
The site of the New Hampshire Treasury during the American Revolution, this museum is home to an original broadside of the Declaration
of Independence and early drafts of the U.S. Constitution.

Black Heritage Walking Tours

222 Court Street. Portsmouth, New Hampshire. (603) 570-8469
Africans have contributed to the economic and cultural fabric of New Hampshire since the 1600s. More than 700 Blacks lived in Portsmouth by the time…

Discover Portsmouth

Corner of Islington and Middle Streets. Portsmouth, New Hampshire. (603) 436-8433
Discover Portsmouth is a central gateway to the historical, cultural and artistic sites and venues around greater Portsmouth. Open April 1 thru December 23.

Fort Constitution

Route 1A, New Castle, New Hampshire.
Built in the 1700s as Fort William and Mary, Fort Constitution was the subject of Paul Revere’s first ride and, some say, the first overt act of the Revolutionary War. The fort is not staffed, nor are there brochures or other information available. Access is through a short walk across the Coast Guard station parking lot.

Fort McClary State Historic Site

Route 103, Kittery, Maine. (207)439-2845
Named for Major Andrew McClary, who died at the Battle of Bunker Hill, Fort McClary is an historic military site that protected the Piscataqua River…

Gilman Garrison House

12 Water Street, Exeter, New Hampshire.
The Gilman Family, owners of lucrative sawmills in Exeter, built a garrison, or fortified structure, near the banks of the Squamscot River in 1709.

Gov. John Langdon House

143 Pleasant St., Portsmouth, New Hampshire. (603) 436-3205
The Gov. John Langdon House is an exceptional Georgian mansion which George Washington thought of as the best in Portsmouth. Its reception rooms are of a grand scale suited to ceremonial occasions and are ornamented by elaborate wood carving in the Rococo
style.

Gundalow Company

Prescott Park, Marcy Street, Portsmouth, New Hampshire. (603) 433-9505
For centuries, sailing barges connected up-river Seacoast to Portsmouth. The last of these “gundalows” disappeared decades ago, but a Seacoast nonprofit offers
educational programs, tours and sailing trips aboard a full-scale replica.

Hamilton House

40 Vaughan’s Lane South Berwick, Maine.  (207) 384-2454
A National Historic Landmark, Hamilton House is recognized as one of the region’s quintessential Colonial Revival-style country estates.

Jackson House

76 Northwest Street, Portsmouth, New Hampshire. (603) 436-3205
The oldest surviving wood frame house in New Hampshire and Maine, Jackson House was built by Richard Jackson in 1664.

John Paul Jones House

43 Middle St., Portsmouth, New Hampshire. (603) 436-8420
Revolutionary War hero John Paul Jones stayed at the home at Court and Middle streets in Portsmouth in 1777 while his ship
“The Ranger” was being built. Today the house is a museum focusing on Jones’ life and the Revolutionary War.

Moffatt-Ladd House and Garden

154 Market Street, Portsmouth, New Hampshire. (603) 436-8221 (Office): 603-430-7968 A National Historic Landmark, the Moffatt-Ladd House is one of
America’s finest Georgian mansions, built for merchant John Moffatt between 1760 and 1763. The grounds also feature one of the region’s finest gardens.

Portsmouth Harbour Trail

Market Square,Portsmouth, New Hampshire. (603) 610-5510
Portsmouth boasts 400 years of history, culture, architecture, and scenic beauty, and you can see it all along the Portsmouth Harbour Trail.

Rundlet-May House

364 Middle St. Portsmouth, New Hampshire. (603) 436-3205
The Rundlet-May House shows four generations of family possessions and taste, ranging from original 1807 wall coverings and furniture to twentieth-century additions by the
Rundlet’s.

Strawbery Banke Museum

14 Hancock St. Portsmouth, New Hampshire. (603) 433-1100
Strawbery Banke Museum illustrates the lives of historic New Englander with restored homes from four centuries and working artisans.

Warner House

150 Daniel St. Portsmouth, New Hampshire. (603) 436-8420
Perhaps the finest brick residence of the first quarter of the eighteenth century left in New England.

Wentworth-Gardner House

50 Mechanic Street, Portsmouth, New Hampshire. (603) 436-4406
Built at the edge of the Piscataqua River in 1760, the Wentworth-Gardner House has been called “the most perfect specimen of Georgian architecture in this country.”

Woodman Institute Museum

182 Central Ave.Dover, New Hampshire. (603) 742-1038
Dover’s Woodman Institute offers an eclectic collection of natural science, local early history, and art. On display are rocks and
minerals, butterflies, stuffed animals, Native American items, early furniture and artifacts from the Civil War, as well as an original 1675 fortified garrison house.

 

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